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WE ARE LEGION: PERC

27 August, 2016

We Are Legion is a regular column with the goal of introducing you some of the members that will make up our roster in the upcoming World of Warcraft’s expansion:- Legion.

Today we bring you our Druid and recruitment officer: Percolator. Perc has been with us for a while now after having joined us during Throne of Thunder. While keeping mostly to his druid, he’s rotated specializations many times, swapping between Restoration and Balance and filling in for whatever role we needed for the tier. To know more, feel free to visit his profile right here on Dragon’s website.

 

1 – Tell us a bit about yourself.

My name is Joseph and I’m currently a mathematics undergraduate studying at the University of Nottingham. I’m 19 years old and I’m originally from London City, and to quote my man Dizzee Rascal: “Where the attitude is bad and the weather is shitty”. When I’m not at university or playing the game you’ll find me running the streets of South East London under the alias ‘Fat Joe’ or in the local establishment with my pals. If you’re ever in Nottingham on a large night out, keep an eye out for me on the floor holding a blue VK in each hand.

 

2 – You joined the team back in Throne of Thunder.  What are your memories from that time and what are the main differences in the team then and now?

It’s important to note that I joined the team with zero gear and experience, honestly I’m not really sure why I got a trial. Needless to say, I didn’t have a clue what was going on having not actually progressed through the tier, however I consider myself a pretty fast learner and got to grips with the encounters and the guild. One thing I immediately noticed, and subsequently fell in love with, is the atmosphere. Never before had I experienced such a unique, driven and friendly atmosphere with the perfect mix of players. Immediately I knew that I would enjoy my time here, and to be frank, the players in the team are the only reason I still play this game.

I can guarantee you that I would have quit a long time ago if circumstances were any difference. Another thing I noticed was the calibre of the players, at least with regards to the healers – the healing team wasn’t perfect but there were several incredibly skilled individuals which made my job that much easier.

There aren’t many differences between then and now, the core beliefs that define us as a guild existed back then, and they still exist today, if not better. The quality of players back then were good, yet pales in comparison to the quality that exists now. The roster since has been steadily improving, which is no doubt a reflection on our ranks achieved. The bar has been set high and the performance required of each member has increased a significant amount, honestly we’re lucky to have a dedicated and skilled team, I consider it a pleasure to be playing with them.

 

Never before had I experienced such a unique, driven and friendly atmosphere with the perfect mix of players. Immediately I knew that I would enjoy my time here, and to be frank, the players in the team are the only reason I still play this game.

 

3 – Hellfire Citadel was Dragon’s best tier yet. Tell us a little about your experience during this last tier’s progress.

I started this tier healing as a restoration druid, which was my main role in the guild with the exception of the end of Blackrock Foundry. It became apparent that there were only a few fights in the raid that required 5 healers, most notably the earlier ones. As a result, I simply wasn’t needed to heal. We were however lacking some damage at this point – I had the gear and the experience, so it made sense for me to play balance when needed. It proved to be quite useful as a large number of the fights favoured balance, so the transition to dps was quite smooth.

When the tier started I was in my Summer break, which at that point was particularly uneventful and I found myself pretty bored. As a result, after a few chats on mumble and 20 minutes of consideration I thought to myself; life moves pretty fast, if you don’t stop and look around once in a while you could miss it. So I booked a flight to Stockholm to stay with our resident restoration shaman Dunderz. We also had our mistweaver monk, Ajwon, there as well, and this proved to be a fun and interesting trip, Stockholm is a beautiful city and I had possibly the best burger of my life there. The internet did go down for a while at one point, which I didn’t think it was even possible in Sweden. I didn’t really plan my flights properly as I ended up getting back to London just as our first progress day on Mannoroth was ending, but I quickly resumed the next day.

Overall progress was fun and the right level of difficulty. My favourite fights include Hellfire Assault, Gorefiend, Mannoroth and Archimonde. Hellfire Assault gets a lot of hate, but I feel the developers captured the essence of what made Galakras an incredible boss, and then transferred that to Hellfire Citadel, I only wish the fight was a little bit more challenging.

 

4 –  You’re Dragon’s recruitment officer. How is it to deal with the responsibility of picking the team’s roster and what are the main challenges?

My role involves analysis into not just our current roster, but also the European player base depending on what our current demands are. A large chunk of my time is devoted to picking apart the logs, collecting data and then analysing the statistics. I’m a firm believer in quantitative analysis, which is why when someone wishes to apply to the guild, 90% of the decision involved is based on logs. Whatever way you look at is, the numbers don’t lie, and it’s easy to see how good a player is based on those alone. That being said, we don’t only recruit robots, recruits have to fit in and have the right mentality and attitude otherwise they won’t get far at all.

The thing about recruitment is, when the roster is stable, life is good. When the roster is not stable, i.e. lacking something important, life is not good. Towards the end of progress we knew that having a third hunter on Archimonde would be invaluable, and at that point we were also missing a strong dps or two. It’s times like those where quality replacements are needed fast, it requires a lot of time and effort into finding the right people. I spent a lot of energy to solve the situation, as at the end of the day our rank depended on it, however in the end it payed off. When the roster is stable, I’m in no rush to get players which means I can take my time which is significantly less stressful.

In regards to the future, I believe it entirely depends on what blizzard does with the game. As long as the raiding aspect is quality, then there will be people playing for that reason. As soon that is no longer there, people will stop playing the game which means guilds will collapse, the recruitment pool will get smaller, competition decreases and we enter this vicious cycle that ultimately results in lack of motivation, and simply a lack of players.

 

Whatever way you look at is, the numbers don’t lie, and it’s easy to see how good a player is based on those alone. That being said, we don’t only recruit robots, recruits have to fit in and have the right mentality and attitude otherwise they won’t get far at all.

 

5 – With Dragon moving into eSports, do you see yourself moving forward to other games and do you think you could deal with recruitment and scouting in big eSports titles?

Recruitment in Warcraft is relatively straightforward, albeit quite time consuming. This is primarily due to the fact that there are central databases for everything, wowprogress exists as a complete directory of guilds where it is possible to list your recruitment needs and also see players looking for a guild. The website also offers a ranking system, which is a direct representation of your guild. You could argue that the rankings are merely indicative of time spent raiding, whilst not entirely incorrect, it is a little narrow minded.

Another powerful tool available is Warcraft logs, the site is managed exceptionally well and is constantly being improved. It’s essentially a store of massive amounts of data, which can then be reviewed and due to the nature of world of Warcraft and raiding, it’s easy to compare and analyse. The logs are the best tool any guild has at their disposal, if they are not utilising it to its full potential, then it’s time to learn.

Now let’s consider recruitment for other games. Suppose we wish to recruit players, or a team for Counter Strike: Global Offensive. The tools available are not nearly as well developed or populated like they are in Warcraft. There doesn’t really exist any form of logs, there is data such as replays and overview statistics, but they simply not nearly as definitive when evaluating a player.

With all that being said, it is by no means impossible. I have briefly looking into other games and found it to be somewhat difficult, however I’m always up for a challenge. All of us here at the team want Dragon to grow into something we can all be proud of, and the first step involves obtaining successful divisions outside of Warcraft. I’ll be doing my bit to ensure that the team is as strong as it can be.